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The Critics Speak on “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2”

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What do the critics think about the sequel to a movie that left them somewhat divided 4 years ago? What are all of the things that they’re saying actually mean? Let’s review.

Go on…The Critics Speak on “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2”

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Every Trip to Redbox Ever

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…Well at least for me.

(this list is inspired by the article A Typical Trip to Blockbuster Video Circa 1995 on Buzzfeed)

1. It’s midnight and I’m sitting alone in my room with nothing to do.

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2. I wake up my roommate and force him to go with me to Walgreens, since it’s the closest place with a Redbox.

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3. I bribe my roommate with McDonald’s and we pile into my car looking like hobos.

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4. We’ve made it to Redbox, but there is approximately 14 & 1/2 people lined up.

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5. I pretend my phone is dead, so my roommate has to look up the free redbox codes while I play Tetris.

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6. We spend 30 minutes trying to decide which movie to watch, despite our mutual dislike for all of them.

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7. We formulate a Pro’s and Con’s list surrounding Dolphin Tale.

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8. We retreat and decide to watch Avengers on Netflix (again).

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9. McDonald’s

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10. Oh no! Netflix added a stupid profile function so NOW I have to press an extra button!

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The Pixar Theory Timeline

Pixar Theory TimelineSince the initial release of The Pixar Theory, there have been countless changes and updates to the Pixar Theory timeline. Since it can get a little complicated (and nutty), I put together a new and improved outline that follows the book and includes all of the recent and upcoming Pixar movies. Enjoy!

Go on…The Pixar Theory Timeline

Turn Your Phone Off

The more connected you are to your phone and the vast online world, the less you are connected to the even larger world around you.

Turn your phone off for a while. Go do an errand and leave the phone at home. You will be amazed at the sense of peace and freedom that comes along with going off the grid.

Now, if you’re really feeling adventurous, you may even want to go a day without your phone. Some would find this laughably easy while others (me) would find this almost insurmountable. Still, it is so worth the gratification knowing that there is more to your life than eyes without a face.

Are Soda CSR Campaigns Really Misleading?

I read a disturbing bit of news yesterday. A Policy Forum article from Washington has been released asserting that corporate social responsibility (CSR) campaigns by soda companies such as PepsiCo and Coca-Cola are misleading and don’t face enough regulation from the government in comparison to Tobacco companies.

I strongly disagree.

My main issue with this study is that it blatantly attacks CSR campaigns such as PepsiCo’s Refresh project, which has awarded grants to community causes such as park restorations, for “distracting” against how harmful their products are.

Read this: “For example, CSR campaigns that include the construction and upgrading of parks for youth who are at risk for diet-related illnesses keep the focus on physical activity, rather than on unhealthful foods and drinks. Such tactics redirect the responsibility for health outcomes from corporations onto its consumers, and externalize the negative effects of increased obesity to the public.”

Let me repeat for emphasis: “Such tactics redirect the responsibility for health outcomes from corporations onto its consumers, and externalize the negative effects of increased obesity to the public.”

My issue with this is the premise, which is that people are victims and can’t take care of themselves. We have a situation where people can’t be blamed for not having the common sense to use soda in moderation. The main point argued is that soda companies aren’t transparent enough about how harmful their beverages are, as if having the ingredients and serving sizes listed out aren’t good enough.

“The soda company made me fat. I thought I would be healthy because they give money to charity.” -Apparently people?

When it comes down to it, bad behavior is a product of ignorance. People know soda is bad for them, but they choose to drink it anyways. Why attack the soda company for using CSR campaigns to increase sales? They are trying to make a profit, sure, but that doesn’t make them  “evil” as some people seem to believe. Their product is loved by many people who do drink soda in moderation. What happens to those of us who want to enjoy a can of soda every now and then?

Yes, we should have basic education for people on what is healthy and what isn’t. People should have access to information that lets them now how to take care of their bodies. The solution is not, however, to criminalize soda for having CSR campaigns and then increase regulation as if soda is as harmful as cigarettes.

The result of increasing regulation with soda companies means several things: prices go up, soda companies disappear, jobs disappear, and people are still suffering obesity. I 100% guarantee you that if soda was abolished from the planet, obesity would not end. People are healthy because they exhibit self control and understand that too much of anything is bad for them.

These campaigns would be “misleading” if soda companies were trying to tell us that their products are good for us. Instead of lying, they actually promote campaigns that encourage people to be active in their communities and give to charity, etc.

So, our society is actually likening soda companies, as this article put it, as a “social ill” on par with Tobacco companies and should be reprimanded for trying to position themselves as being “socially acceptable” through CSR. What they’re saying is that a person is wrongfully believing that soda is good for them because a soda company gave some money to charity.

As far as I can see, this is baseless on the fact that soda companies are not in the business of controlling our behavior. They’re selling us a product.

JN

At Some Point, Any Step is in the Right Direction

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We love to talk a lot about what we’ll accomplish someday. Friends get together and find pleasure in dreaming like teenagers. “Eventually, I’ll get out of this town. Eventually, I’ll get the job I’ve always wanted.”

Something strange happens. We stagnate, and not for any particular reason. Your environment has a knack for finding ways to tie you down, even when you’re unmarried or without children. Jobs, family, and friends always give us convincing reasons to stick to what we know.

Familiarity breeds contentment, then contempt. That’s why there are times when taking any step, even backwards, is in the right direction. A step backwards can get you back to a place where you try harder in an unfamiliar setting, pushing you and reminding you of what value you possess.

I could say something as generic as, “take risks.” But it really comes down to, “just do something.”

Jon Negroni is the Director of Public Relations, Promotion, and Marketing at Richter10.2 Media Group. For more information regarding Richter10.2, check out our introduction video here.

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