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Retro Reviews: Supernatural Movies / Part-Time Characters

supernatural movies.jpg

This week Part-Time Characters goes back in time to review some classic horror/supernatural movies. We did our best to keep a brave face. It’s another special episode of Retro Reviews, where we each pick a movie we haven’t seen but we have been meaning to watch for quite some time. Then we all discuss them and decide if they live up to the hype.

One of us watched the original Ghosbusters, a perfect blend of comedy and horror, but they were less than impressed by it. Can you guess who it was? Then we discuss a major horror film that came out in the early 2000s, The Others. If this movie didn’t make you keep the lights on at night, you are immune to ghosts and anything supernatural. Last but not least, we review a 70s cult classic, Suspiria. With the remake just announced last week with a teaser trailer, we decided to check out the original film and boy, it’s a lot of fake blood, red velvet and dubbed dialogue.

Go on…Retro Reviews: Supernatural Movies / Part-Time Characters

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Cinemaholics Review: A Quiet Place and Blockers

quiet place

Special guest Rebecca Pahle came on the show this week to help us break the silence on A Quiet Place, a new horror film that’s impressing at the box office and earned an A- from me in my review. Directed by perennial camera-shrugger John Krasinski (AKA Jim Halpert and that guy you actually recognize in the indie movie you’re watching), A Quiet Place is sure to take some moviegoers by surprise with its tense, emotional storytelling, and with Krasinski starring alongside real-life wife Emily Blunt, it’s safe to say this is a film worth talking loudly about.

Later in the show, we reviewed Blockers, a new teen comedy starring Leslie Mann, John Cena, and Ike Barinholtz. I shared my thoughts on King in the Wilderness, a new Martin Luther King Jr. documentary on HBO. Will finally saw Isle of Dogs and Unsane. And Maveryke caught Wind River, a 2017 movie that just hit Netflix streaming.

Question for you: How would you survive in a world where you can’t make a sound?

Go on…Cinemaholics Review: A Quiet Place and Blockers

‘A Quiet Place’ Is Scary For Kids, But Terrifying For Adults

QUIET PLACE

I don’t have children, so I have to imagine the new film A Quiet Place is far more frightening for a parent than it could hope to be for someone like me. It’s probably more impactful, too.

In A Quiet Place, most of the world has been eradicated. A young family of survivors has to live as silently as possible to avoid the blind, super-hearing creatures who prey upon anything making a sound. Danger is everywhere. The family can’t escape these bulletproof nightmares.

So the family perseveres by creating strict, logical rules. They communicate with lights and sign language. They walk barefoot. They make soundproof trails and play board games with cloth materials. The message is quiet, but it’s clear. To parents in any context, the world is a scary place, and every family has a set of idiosyncratic methods for raising their children. In this case, it’s playing a high-stakes version of “the quiet game.”

Go on…‘A Quiet Place’ Is Scary For Kids, But Terrifying For Adults

Horror Movie Remakes & IT / Part-Time Characters

stephen kings it



This week on Part-Time Characters we face our biggest fears, whether it’s watching a horror movie from our childhood or talking face to face with Jerry-Garry-Larry. The gang gets together to discuss the remake of IT, adapted from Stephen King’s novel. We bring in a special guest to review the film and compare it to the classic TV movie from 1990 starring the one and only Tim Curry.

Go on…Horror Movie Remakes & IT / Part-Time Characters

Cinemaholics Review: Annabelle: Creation

annabelle

On this latest episode of Cinemaholics, I sat down with Maveryke Hines to review Annabelle: Creation, the new horror film out of “The Conjuring universe.” We also had a great conversation about our favorite horror films and started things off with a trailer breakdown of mother!, the upcoming Darren Aronofsky film.

Our conversation is spoiler-free up until the 40 minute mark, but after that is fair game. And I want to take a moment to mention a few podcasts we plugged this week that we encourage you to check out if you’re a fan of Cinemaholics.

Many of you already know and love Part-Time Characters since it’s hosted on this website. But we also mentioned The Legendarium Podcast, a fantastic resources for fans of fantasy books and the occasional movie review. I recently guested on their show to talk about The Dark Tower, and it was definitely time well spent.

There’s also Down the Hall, a great “take back movie night” podcast with recommendations for streaming releases from Chet and Rodney, plus celebrity interviews. Be sure to check them out.

Go on…Cinemaholics Review: Annabelle: Creation

‘It Comes At Night’ Tries Way Too Hard To Make You Think It’s A Horror Movie

It Comes At Night

It Comes At Night is yet another horror film from A24 that promises to wrap viewers up in an atmospheric resurgence of creepy tales that rely less on jump scares and more on pure dread. Unfortunately, It Comes At Night falls slightly short of both.

 Any film that can transport me into a creepy setting I haven’t thought of in a while, even for a few short moments, is enough to praise the director for pulling off one of the horror genre’s greatest challenges. Trey Edward Shults (Krisha) wrote and direct It Comes At Night, which mostly delivers on what I love the most about these movies. I felt like I was alone in the dark of the woods, or the flashlight brazed wooden hallways of the main house. The fact that this film is centered around a lone survivalist family living in a large house in the woods while an undefined virus wipes out humanity in the nearby cities is just a bonus.

Joel Edgerton plays Paul, the patriarch with the keys to the house wrapped safely around his neck, making the rules for his wife and son and taking as few risks as possible to ensure their safety. Shults mines a lot of symbolism and relatability out of this simple premise, especially when a new young family shows up and is allowed to share the house with Paul, Sarah, and Travis. The growing paranoia that inevitably becomes a boiling point between the two families is wonderfully set up and established, in no small part thanks to Travis’s frequent nightmare sequences that serve as mini-prophecies that effectively delay the climax.

Only when the climax does come, it’s revealed that the entire movie is essentially a misdirect. Though some in the audience will welcome this, if only because they were too caught up in the real movie in front of them, many more will feel let down by quite a few things. The title, It Comes At Night, is an intentional prank. Though it can be stretched to fit what’s truly to come, you’ll feel less convinced as Shults places extraneous scenes of suggestive catastrophe that receive no payoff within their own terms.

It Comes At Night

It’s almost impressive how overstuffed the film feels anyway with its ambiguous visual storytelling, a highlight at times, while maddening the next. At one moment, you might be trying to understand the significance of the red door, the only way in and out of the house. Is it meant to invoke Passover, or some type of paradox in how it means “Welcome?” The film doesn’t offer its own stance and instead  rushes to an equally ambiguous ending that at first glance leaves many questions unanswered.

For this reason, It Comes At Night feels like a mandate to give it multiple viewings and a wide array of interpretation for the full effect. Though I never felt at any point during the runtime that this is the main draw, deservedly. What could have been an unconventional post-apocalypse narrative drenched in nihilism instead comes off as one of the Walking Dead episodes that tries to be more meaningful than it really is. It’s a passable (albeit beautiful) thriller infatuated with horror, while never bothering to commit.

Grade: B


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What If Pixar Made A Horror Movie?

Let’s get spooky, Pixar detectives. I went live on Super News last week to craft the ultimate Pixar horror movie (with audience help, of course). We also did a giveaway for the person with the best suggestion, so make sure you check out the show LIVE every week (Wednesdays at 7pm Pacific) so you can get in on the action. We’ll be announcing a new giveaway tonight…

You guys had some excellent suggestions I never had a chance to read aloud (too many comments to keep track of!) So here are some of my favorites:

  • (Tim) Why not one about a reverse world of horror , like something cute is scary cause of the kids in town would have grown up by really scary stuff like ghosts
  • (Johnathan) A Haunted Hotel like Hotel Transylvania Mashed up With American Horror Story And Nightmare before Christmas. Different scary worlds in the hotel rooms. (LA,CA)
  • (Roscoe) A family of terrifying blood-thirsty werewolves, however the young son is a vegetarian and doesn’t like meat. I’ll take a cheque.
  • (Julian) Little girl walks around with a clown doll who only she can see as a real clown ( kinda like wilfred tv show) and the clown traps people into their own version of sowened dolls?
  • (Kashanna) Pixar version of the books “Scary stories to tell in the dark.” For each story use different Pixar character.

There are tons more, and they’re all splendid. Be sure to check them out here.

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