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5 New Year’s Resolutions That are Pointless

Welcome to the beginning of 2014. We have a long year ahead of us, and I’m definitely confident that it’s going to be a good one.

One year ago, I wrote an article explaining why I don’t make New Year’s Resolutions. Reading it again, I couldn’t help but feel extremely embarrassed toward how terrible my writing was a year ago. Makes me wonder what I’ll think in 2015.

This year, I’m not going to go on a rant about how much I dislike New Year’s resolutions and will instead impart something a little more applicable.

Here are a few resolutions you shouldn’t make.

New Year's Resolutions

1. I RESOLVE TO LOSE WEIGHT.

Cool. Everyone wants to look better and feel better about themselves. But let’s take a step back. This resolution may be popular, but it’s also regarded as a punchline when it comes to the new year.

Why?

People rarely follow-up. They start putting the work in and gradually fall out of this resolution. I believe that one of the reasons for this is because they’re wanting the wrong thing.

Instead of desiring to “lose weight,” scale back on something more meaningful. Make a resolution to be healthy.

Being healthy is more important, first of all, and it doesn’t require your body to go through drastic changes in order to make you feel like you’ve accomplished something.

Rather, being healthy is a lifestyle that is addicting and ultimately easy to grow accustomed to, even if your ideal weight is never achieved (though it usually is).

 

2. I RESOLVE TO TRAVEL MORE.

There’s nothing wrong with wanting to travel, but why does this have to be such a general desire?

I’ve written before on how people tend to dwell on “finding themselves” and end up losing themselves. Fixation on traveling for the sake of it is a symptom of this.

Even if we do follow-up on this resolution, we still end up feeling starved of fulfillment. The simple remedy is to give yourself a reason for going somewhere, aside from because you think other people will think it’s cool.

Go to wherever your ancestors are from. Visit your favorite artist’s museum in France. Go somewhere you are scared to go to.

The simple act of putting meaning behind your soul-searching will make it that much more achievable and fulfilling.

 

3. I RESOLVE TO GET A BETTER JOB.

The problem with this is that you’re putting the cart before the horse. Instead of trying to skip a step, focus on getting better at the job you already have.

Better yet, perhaps there is some education you need to finish before you can start sending off applications that won’t get read (was that too mean? Read that last part in a pleasant inner voice just in case).

 

4. I RESOLVE TO SAVE MONEY.

Slow down Congress. Saving money is impossible if your real problem is spending too much.

So be more deliberate about fixing your budget problems. Before you start putting money away indiscriminately, look at exactly what you need to spend and what you want to spend. Then you can cut everything across the board and ensure that you’re actually going to have money left over to save.

 

5. I RESOLVE TO FIND THE LOVE OF MY LIFE.

Hopefully, only the single people are making this resolution.

Look, being in a couple is a fine goal to aspire to, but it honestly reeks of desperation when it’s one of your main priorities.

Instead of worrying so much about making sure you’re not alone in a romantic sense, try to be a better person instead so that you can make better friends. Relationships are usually much better when they grow out of friendship anyway.

What are resolutions that you find pointless? You know, besides resolving to read more from Jon Negroni?

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Why I Don’t Make New Year’s Resolutions

Image Courtesy of hhdwallpapes.com

Like last year, I have made no resolutions this year. I find the exercise pointless, but probably not for the same reasons you do.

The running gag is that we make resolutions and break them rapidly, putting people in two camps: those who go for it anyways and try to resolve, and the people who give the tradition lip service at best.

I fall into neither category. It’s mostly because the date is so arbitrary. Why is each year considered a blank slate? This doesn’t even compute with the business calendar. Everything that affected me in 2012 won’t just get up and leave for 2013. Looking at the new year has a new start is cute and fine, but for me, it doesn’t hold much water.

The truth is that your life isn’t characterized by years. It’s divided into stages. You have the freshman stage of college which can last your freshman year of college and bleed into your sophomore year, you have your senior stage of college that really begins the summer before your junior year, and you have your postgrad stage which starts in the spring of your senior year of college. These are the times when you need to make resolutions; when your life is actually changing.

You just had a baby. Resolution. You’re moving to a new city. Resolution. Someone close to you has died. Resolution.

I don’t want to knock New Year’s. I’m still going to have a good time and celebrate how great 2012 was and look forward to a new set of 12 months. I’m just sick of people telling me to make life decisions that don’t fit within the context of anything that’s actually beginning tomorrow.

Like what you read? Connect with me further via twitter @JonNegroni. I’ll follow back if you seem like a real person.

Don’t forget to check out THE JON REPORT every day, updated at 8am for a list of today’s main headlines as selected by my editorial team (me) 

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