Cinemaholics Podcast: Our Top 10 Movies of 2017

2017

2017 is over, but we’re just getting started. I’m not usually the biggest fan of conversations over general rankings (my yearly power rankings aside), but I do find them most useful years later, when I’m trying to remember what I thought of the filmgoing landscape with some perspective. That’s why I do rankings, period, and it’s triple effective when I get to hear Top 10s from my Cinemaholics cohosts.

Our lists do feature some expected overlap, including a clear Cinemaholics “winner,” if you want to call it that. Turns out Brigsby Bear had the most collective impact on me, Will Ashton, and Maveryke Hines, and hopefully some of you awesome listeners.

Enjoy the episode, and if you just can’t wait, here are our Top 10 lists written out below.

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The Shape of Water: The Past is the Key to the Future

the shape of water

Watching The Shape of Water, I expected a wholly original story based on a simple premise. A woman falls in love with a merman. Instead, Guillermo del Toro’s film has a surprisingly familiar set of themes and ideas. Its originality lies in how it blends three core messages for the viewer to internalize.

The first message: the past is the key to the future. This scaly, unpredictable creature found in the Amazon is implied to be an ancient force of nature far removed from the technological advances of 60s Baltimore. Yet every character wants to use this creature as a device for unlocking the future. A competitive future. A future of scientific discoveries. Even a future of artistic expression.

The second message: the people who will unlock the future are the silent. The unseen. The meek will indeed inherit the earth. Finally, the third message: love is the purest way to unlock the future, bringing about our greatest talents. Love is our purpose.

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Cinemaholics Review: Lady Bird and Murder on the Orient Express

Murder

For the show this week, I’m joined by my regular co-host Will Ashton and special guest Kristen Lopez from Paste Magazine, Film School Rejects, and The Young Folks to review Murder on the Orient Express and Lady Bird, two films that honestly couldn’t be anymore different, but we’ll get to that in the podcast.

We originally recorded the show with Mini Reviews as usual, but sound issues forced us to cut the episode in half (which worked out because the episode had gone on far longer than planned). We’ll do those reviews for CocoLast Flag Flying, and Walking Dead Season 8 next week.

That said, the main show covers two featured reviews at length, no spoilers for either. The first movie is Lady Bird, a wonderful A24 film directed and written by Greta Gerwig that has been topping many “best of 2017” lists already on the minds of critics. It’s yet another Oscar-worthy performance from Saoirse Ronan (Brooklyn) complemented by a fantastic cast. Murder on the Orient Express is the second review of the show, directed by and starring Kenneth Branagh as Hercule Poirot in the adaptation of Agatha Christie’s landmark novel. It’s the classic “whodunnit” modernized for 2017, so be sure to manage your expectations if you’re planning on giving this one a shot.

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Soderbergh’s ‘Logan Lucky’ Is A Heartland Heist Worth Watching

Logan Lucky was directed by Steven Soderbergh, the man behind the Ocean’s 11 films and Magic Mike. It features hilarious characters, farfetched schemes, and a leisurely pace that will take some by surprise, but like its band of robbers, it’s a film that’s easy to underestimate. It’s no secret that Hollywood has shown little interest in

Who Was ‘The Dark Tower’ Made For? — Cinemaholics

dark tower

“Stephen King is obviously one of the most prolific writers of all time,” said Will Ashton on the latest episode of Cinemaholics, where we reviewed The Dark Tower and discussed at length why and how this movie confounds us. The show opened with a quick aside about our favorite Stephen King film adaptations, and as some of you might have predicted, I had some not-so-popular opinions to express about The Shining.

We covered a few extra movies in a shorter episode this week (our originally recorded episode with extended cast was unfortunately lost to the audio oblivion), including Lady Macbeth and Detroit. We’ve talked about both movies in previous episodes, but now we’ve all seen both and were able to share notes on two of the most impressive films in 2017. And Will capped the episode off with a mini review for Girls Trip, setting off a great discussion about summer comedies.

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‘The Dark Tower’ Is A Genre Mashup, So Why Is It So Generic?

The Dark Tower was directed by Nikolaj Arcel and is the latest film adaptation of a popular Stephen King novel, this one being the first in a fantasy series that is more or less about a western gunslinger hunting down a sadistic wizard in a universe of competing genre ideas. And yet the film

Does ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ End This Trilogy Well? — Cinemaholics

cinemaholics

I’ve never been the biggest fan of the prequel trilogy beginning with Rise of the Planet of the Apes, but I do enjoy them as one of the better franchises available on the occasional summer. Joining me to discuss and review the final entry (for now), Will Ashton and Maveryke Hines share their own take on the long, fascinating tale that is most impressive for its motion-capture work featuring Andy Serkis than pretty much anything else.

We also did a feature review for The Big Sick, one of my favorite movies of 2017 so far and a true delight for fans of romantic comedies and really comedies in general. It’s a great discussion that we’ve been patiently waiting to have since last month. Our mini reviews this week include Lady MacbethA Ghost Story, and The Standups.

Continue reading Does ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ End This Trilogy Well? — Cinemaholics