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Toy Story 4, Coco, and The Pixar Theory

Tamara Fuentes, writing for Seventeen, mentioned the Pixar Theory in a recent article. She broke down the theory from its 2013 roots and finished with this interesting bit:

Negroni still hasn’t explained how newer movies like Coco and Toy Story 4 fit in, but we’re sure they fit in here somewhere. Until then, guess we’ll just have to rewatch all of our favorite Disney Pixar movies to see this theory unfold for ourselves.

I’ve been hard at work on the upcoming book based on the theory, which is being republished. And yes, Toy Story 4 and Coco, along with all the other newest Pixar movies that have come out since the original theory will be explored in my little conspiracy theory corner of nonsense. It’s a fun book, and I’m excited for you all to read it.

More than just a collection of theories, it’s a book about what it means to be a fan of Pixar movies, and movies in general. I know a lot of you have been asking about getting your hands on a copy, especially since the first book went out of print and is currently unavailable in all forms. In fact, not even I have a copy of the book (I gave them all away, mostly to readers requesting them).

In the meantime, I want to open up the comments section for something special. I want to know: what does Pixar mean to you? Answer the question in the comments below, along with the name you want credited, and it might show up somewhere in the book. It would thrill me to pieces to have even more fans of the movies involved with this project in some way.

Thanks, as always, for reading.


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Disney Announces ‘Soul,’ The Next Pixar Film Directed by Pete Docter

We won’t have to wait long to see another new Pixar movie after Onward premieres next March. Disney just revealed that their “untitled Pixar movie” slated for June 19, 2020 (just a little over three months after Onward) will be called Soul, directed by Pete Docter (Monsters Inc., Up, Inside Out) and produced by Dana Murray (Lou).

Pixar hasn’t updated their “coming soon” section with information about Soul, but we have received a synopsis, starting with this Tweet from the D23 Twitter account:

Additionally, Disney released this tagline:

Ever wonder where your passion, your dreams and your interests come from? What is it that makes you … you?”

While reading these descriptions, my first thought was Doctor Strange, the Marvel movie that partially takes place in New York and features inter-dimensional realms that could be referred to as “cosmic.” I also wondered if this might be like Neverwhere, the novel by Neil Gaiman, where a mystical world exists underneath London. But after giving this some more thought, I’m pretty sure the journey they’re talking about simply begins in New York, then takes the characters “into” cosmic realms, as in space.

If that’s the case, I’m extremely curious how the cosmos might explain the idea of what makes someone who they “are.” We all have souls, but an explanation for what the soul literally is tends to be a more introspective, perhaps meditative process, not something external. In other words, how would we be able to explain human existence — presumably answering “life’s most important questions” — by going out into space? Think Interstellar, but perhaps with the whole “love is truth” thing toned down slightly.

I love the idea of Pixar returning to space, which they haven’t really done since WALL-E. There are so many stories they can tell around the universe, especially if alien creatures get involved, and if the whole “cosmic realms” definition is as fantastical as it sounds. I’m especially happy to see something so seemingly ambitious coming from Pete Docter, whose original drafts for Up were like something out of a swashbuckling cloud city fantasy.

As for the title poster, there’s not much to speculate on, yet. The color scheme is basic blue, with some orange and yellow flair. The “o” in the middle looks like it might be some sort of eye or pupil, but it would be a stretch to call this pattern anything “galactic” or “cosmic.” If anything, the font here suggests the film is quite playful, not as heady or operatic as the description might imply.

It’s also worth mentioning that Soul coming out so soon after Onward delivers its own set of challenges. Pixar has only tried to do two original movies in the same year once before, and it led to box office disaster. Inside Out was a huge hit, but audiences didn’t really bother with The Good Dinosaur, despite the film receiving a prime November/holiday release spot.

The gap between Onward and Soul is even smaller, which will make it difficult for Pixar and Disney to effectively market both movies within the same time frame. I get the intention, of course. Disney’s release schedule has morphed into positioning event movies that dominate every month of the year. So to them, it’s like releasing two Marvel Cinematic Universe movies within just a few months of each other. It works because the brand name is so strong.

But that assumes the Pixar brand name is strong enough to overcome both these films being non-sequels, and therefore new properties that will require more persuasive, noise-breaking advertising to get the word out. This is why Cars 3 releasing the same year as Coco wasn’t much of an issue (though to be fair, neither film was a major box office success by Pixar standards).

I worry about this because I don’t want to see original Pixar films fail at the box office. That affects how many resources get devoted to these films down the road, and if you’re sick of Pixar sequels coming out more often than originals, than you should be paying very close attention to the next few years, which will see several original films vying for attention in a crowded theatrical marketplace. That said, Pixar has one advantage that can’t be discounted. They have the Disney machine.

Get updates on my theories, books, and giveaways by joining my Mailing List.

Or just say hey on Twitter: @JonNegroni


Pixar Explains Why There’s No Short Before ‘Toy Story 4’

toy story 4
Jonas Rivera (Left), Josh Cooley (Center), Mark Nielsen (Right)

Over the weekend, Disney confirmed what many of us had expected for months: there would be no Pixar animated short attached to Toy Story 4 in theaters. Now, we have an actual explanation, courtesy of Mark Nielsen and Jonas Rivera, two of the film’s producers.

Nielsen and Rivera spoke with Yahoo Movies UK to set the record straight:

“The real reason is resources. The people at the studio were all needed to work on feature films at the time. There was a big demand to finish up the last few films, and there just wasn’t the people to make a short.”

This is in line with what I guessed might be the reason just yesterday. The animated shorts are there to give animators something fun to do in between feature films, but they’re not really a priority. If there are a lot of feature-length projects to work on, which are where Pixar makes its money, then shorts are inevitably going to fall by the wayside.

Thankfully, that’s not the full story. Rivera weighed in as well, promising the shorts will return:

“We love the shorts. And we’re continuing to do the SparkShorts, and all that stuff at Pixar, but yeah, it just didn’t line up for this one.”

The optimistic side of me wants to take Rivera at face value on this. I’ve met him in person, and he’s been very straightforward with the press for as long as I’ve followed these movies. But my worry remains: if it didn’t line up for Toy Story 4, then that could mean it won’t line up for some other Pixar films down the road.

Maybe we get an animated theatrical short every so often, but Pixar has a lot on its plate at the moment, and that’s not likely to change anytime soon. The box office success of Finding Dory, Incredibles 2, and assumably Toy Story 4 will strengthen the studio’s resources over the next few years, essentially financing the next four original, non-sequel films they have coming.

But as I mentioned yesterday, theatrical shorts aren’t known to be moneymakers. If Pixar can expend its resources on shorts and shows for Disney+, which they can get paid for, then who knows if they’ll have enough time or budget to properly develop a theatrical short good enough to place before their movies? Pixar probably knows, but for now, I doubt they want to raise any alarms unnecessarily.

My guess is that we will get a short of some kind before Onward, but maybe not the other Pixar film coming out in 2020. This might be the start of a more gradual phasing out of the short films, or perhaps a more inconsistent release schedule determined by how many animators Pixar hires or recently hired. These are details only they are keenly aware of at the moment and likely planning out for the next five or six years. So we won’t know what’s really going on anytime soon.

Get updates on my theories, books, and giveaways by joining my Mailing List.

Or just say hey on Twitter: @JonNegroni


‘Toy Story 4’ Won’t Have an Animated Short, Which Could Be The Start of a New Trend

toy story 4

We’ve known for a while that Pixar has no intention of attaching an animated short of some kind to precede Toy Story 4, but a Disney representative recently made it official, per Slate:

Toy Story 4 will break with tradition by going without an animated short when it enters theaters June 21, a representative for Disney confirmed to Slate. That makes it the first Pixar movie without one since the original Toy Story in 1995…

Again, this isn’t a surprise. We would have had heard about a short premiering with the movie a long time ago, but there’s been no hint of anything, not even one of the Sparkshorts Pixar released on YouTube (some speculated they might at least show one of those for the sake of showing something).

I’m seeing a mix of reactions to this, with many Pixar followers assuming this to be an anomaly; surely, Pixar wouldn’t ditch a tradition they’ve held since A Bug’s Life, right? Others, like me, are less optimistic. Pixar now has a hand in helping Disney develop computer-animated shows for the Disney+ streaming service, and the Sparkshorts are a newer program meant to push boundaries and cultivate new voices in and around the animation community. Feature shorts might not be considered a necessary expense for a studio under new leadership.

I’m not implying that this was a call made by Pete Docter, who now leads Pixar creatively, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the company has decided to refocus their efforts on shows and cheaper shorts that will accomplish the same goals as the feature ones (they’re really meant to keep employees working in between film projects).

And it’s worth pointing out that Coco paved the way for gradual changes in how Disney and Pixar handle short films. In 2017, Coco was the first Pixar film to come with a Walt Disney Animation short: Olaf’s Frozen Adventure, which was met with severe disdain for its bizarrely long runtime.

Bottom line: short films don’t make much money, if any, for Pixar. But their animators can be put to good use helping Disney and other production companies with spin-off shows, like the upcoming Monsters at Work, though the extent of Pixar’s specific contribution to these and other Disney+ projects is a bit unclear at the moment.

But maybe I’m wrong. Maybe Pixar just didn’t have a short film ready in time for Toy Story 4, and for whatever reason, they’re downplaying this sudden change. We’ll know soon enough when more news comes in about Onward, their next film arriving in theaters by next March.

UPDATE: Pixar has given an official explanation for why they didn’t make a short. You can read their response here.

Get updates on my theories, books, and giveaways by joining my Mailing List.

Or just say hey on Twitter: @JonNegroni


My ‘Toy Story 4’ Review

Published on Cinemaholics:

The Toy Story movies have always been filled with lots of toys, and rightfully so. But every film so far has mostly played around with the character of Woody the cowboy doll. His story has progressed both positively and negatively to some extent over the years, from his fear of being replaced in the first Toy Story, his fear of being thrown away in Toy Story 2, and his fear of being forgotten in Toy Story 3.

Almost a decade later, Toy Story 4 confronts a new fear for Woody that not very many family movies even attempt to tackle: a fear of no longer having a purpose.

You can read the full review here. I’ll be adding some complementary thoughts about the movie over the next few weeks and beyond. There’s a lot to think about, good and ill. But mostly good.


Toy Story 4 (My Spoiler-free Reaction)

I’m not allowed to say anything about Toy Story 4 in too much detail yet, but I have been permitted to share “social media reactions” for now.

Here’s what I’ve said so far on Twitter:

I saw Toy Story 4 at the AMC Metreon in San Francisco, where I’ve watched plenty of other Pixar films like Inside Out, The Good Dinosaur, Finding Dory, Cars 3, Coco, and Incredibles 2. It’s a great theater worth checking out if you’re ever in town (I recommend getting the coffee served by an actual robot).

I happened to be sitting next to Jeffrey M. Anderson, film critic for The San Francisco Examiner, and we had a brief chat beforehand about the Fox lot in LA, one of the worst theaters in SF, and some other topics you probably won’t find as interesting as we did.

Jeffrey has been reviewing films for decades, and during all of Toy Story 4, I couldn’t help but notice how equally transfixed we were by what is admittedly a simple movie in many ways, and one primarily created for children. We both laughed with the film throughout, regardless (me more than him, to be clear).

This is worth bringing up, I think, because Toy Story has long served as a “stealth bridge” between older and younger generations. These movies have always been about nostalgia, but not an exclusive type of nostalgia you’ll see in lesser films trying to tap into potent emotions that wring the past dry.

Even a kid like me can have nostalgia for the first time I saw Toy Story in a theater (my second theatrical experience ever, after The Lion King). And when I first saw that film, I connected with Woody’s sense of anxiety when it came to feeling surpassed. In Toy Story 2, I felt his longing for existential purpose. In Toy Story 3, I wept like everyone else to see that purpose fulfilled. And now, in Toy Story 4, a movie about what you do after you’ve done your best, I’m weeping all over again.

Yes, Toy Story 4 does what it’s made to do. It’s an entertaining film that will make money because children will want to see it. And like in many other Pixar films, adults won’t feel left out when they see it, too. We can revel in the same, silent joy, keeping us connected to generations we don’t always fully understand.

Toy Story 4 is another wonderful return to a world I thought we’d seen the last of in any major way. But like Woody himself, this old film series still has a few new tricks.


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Or just say hey on Twitter: @JonNegroni

Will There Be More ‘Toy Stories’ After ‘Toy Story 4’?

toy story 4

Caitlyn Busch, reporting for SyFyWire:

Will there be another Toy Story movie?

“We sort of joked that we thought Toy Story 2 was the last one,” producer Jonas Rivera said at first of working on Toy Story 4. “When we finished that one we thought that was the end of the story. And how we approached [Toy Story 4] … with Woody as the protagonist, this was the final chapter. And as filmmakers, we feel satisfied that this is where you could end it.

He continued: “Now there’s an implied future to all these films. And we sort of ‘never say never’ at Pixar. But as storytellers, we’re satisfied with this as closing the chapter.”

This is Public Relations 101. Rivera probably doesn’t want fans to expect more Toy Story movies or even think about audience fatigue. But he also doesn’t want to make false promises.

So here’s where it gets interesting.

Go on…Will There Be More ‘Toy Stories’ After ‘Toy Story 4’?

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